Biomechanics of Foot Strikes
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Harvard Skeletal Biology Lab

Daniel E. Lieberman Daniel E. Lieberman, PhD - Professor in the Department Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. He was educated at Harvard (AB, MA, Ph.D.) and Cambridge University (M. Phil). His research combines experimental biology and paleontology to ask why and how the human body looks and functions the way it does. He is especially interested in the origin of bipedal walking, the biology and evolution of endurance running, and the evolution of the human head. He also loves to run.
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Madhusudhan Venkadesan Madhusudhan Venkadesan, PhD - Postdoctoral fellow in the School of Engineering & Applied Sciences and the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.
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Adam I. Daoud Adam I. Daoud - Research Assistant in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. He received his AB from Harvard College in Human Evolutionary Biology in 2009. His research interest lies in investigating the ways in which the human body is suited particularly well for endurance running, considering issues relating to running injury and running economy.
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William A. Werbel William A. Werbel - Medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School. He received his AB from Harvard College in Human Evolutionary Biology in 2008 and worked as a research assistant in the Skeletal Biology Lab at Harvard University in 2008 and 2009.

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Creative Commons License

Running Barefoot or in Minimal Footwear by Daniel Lieberman et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Based on the research published in the scientific journal Nature.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available by contacting Daniel Lieberman.